Many people have contacted the Order asking how they might send help to the people of Iraq who are suffering so much in these days. Help can be sent through the Province of France which will ensure that it is used to help communities still in Iraq as well as Iraqi families who are already refugees elsewhere.

Information on how to send donations can be found at the link.

theraccolta
theraccolta:

The Friars
      The friars differed from the monks in certain ways.  The brethren by their profession were bound, not to any locality or house, but to the province, which usually consisted of the entire number of houses in a country.  They did not, consequently, form individual families in their various establishments, like the monks in their monasteries.  They also, at first, professed the strictest poverty, not being allowed to possess even corporate property like the monastic Orders.  They were by their profession mendicants, living on alms, and only holding the mere buildings in whey they dwelt.  
The Dominicans, or Black Friars 
     The founder of these friars was a Spaniard named Dominic, a canon of the diocese of Osma, in Old Castile, at the close of the twelfth century.  They were known as Dominicans, from their founder ; “Preaching Friars,” from their mission to convert heretics ;  in England, “Black Friars,” from the colour of their cloak ; and in France, “Jacobins,” from having had their first house in the Rue St. Jacques, at Paris.  Their rule was founded on that of St. Augustine, and it was verbally approved in the Council of Lateran in A.D. 1215, and the following year formally by Honorius III.  Their founder, having been a secular canon of Osma in Spain, his friars t first adopted the ordinary dress of canons ; but about A.D. 1219 they took a white tunic, scapular, and hood, over which, when in church of when they went abroad, they wore a black cappa, or cloak, with a hood of the same color.  They first came to England with Peter de Rupibus, bishop of Winchester, in A.D. 1221 and their Order quickly spread.  In the first year of their arrival they obtained a foothold in the University of Oxford, and at the time of the general suppression of the religious Orders in the Sixteeth century they had fifty-eight convents in the country. 
English Monastic Life by F.A. Gasquet.  (pages 234 & 236.)

theraccolta:

The Friars

      The friars differed from the monks in certain ways.  The brethren by their profession were bound, not to any locality or house, but to the province, which usually consisted of the entire number of houses in a country.  They did not, consequently, form individual families in their various establishments, like the monks in their monasteries.  They also, at first, professed the strictest poverty, not being allowed to possess even corporate property like the monastic Orders.  They were by their profession mendicants, living on alms, and only holding the mere buildings in whey they dwelt.  

The Dominicans, or Black Friars 

     The founder of these friars was a Spaniard named Dominic, a canon of the diocese of Osma, in Old Castile, at the close of the twelfth century.  They were known as Dominicans, from their founder ; “Preaching Friars,” from their mission to convert heretics ;  in England, “Black Friars,” from the colour of their cloak ; and in France, “Jacobins,” from having had their first house in the Rue St. Jacques, at Paris.  Their rule was founded on that of St. Augustine, and it was verbally approved in the Council of Lateran in A.D. 1215, and the following year formally by Honorius III.  Their founder, having been a secular canon of Osma in Spain, his friars t first adopted the ordinary dress of canons ; but about A.D. 1219 they took a white tunic, scapular, and hood, over which, when in church of when they went abroad, they wore a black cappa, or cloak, with a hood of the same color.  They first came to England with Peter de Rupibus, bishop of Winchester, in A.D. 1221 and their Order quickly spread.  In the first year of their arrival they obtained a foothold in the University of Oxford, and at the time of the general suppression of the religious Orders in the Sixteeth century they had fifty-eight convents in the country. 

English Monastic Life by F.A. Gasquet.  (pages 234 & 236.)


On Friday July 11, 2014, the feast of St Benedict the legislator of monastic life; a new Monastery was blessed for the Dominican Nuns, in Bogoun, a village about thirty kilometers from Dassa in Benin Republic. This new monastery is a foundation of the monastery of Our Lady of Peace of Rweza, Burundi.
The four founding Dominican nuns: Sr Noémie MURERWA, Sr Severa NIZIGIYIMANA, Sr Rose Marie SIMAZEYOSE et Sr Languide HAKIZIMANA were installed in their monastery at the end of the Eucharistic celebration presided over by Fr Clement AHOUANDJINOU, op, from the Dominican convent of Cotonou.

On Friday July 11, 2014, the feast of St Benedict the legislator of monastic life; a new Monastery was blessed for the Dominican Nuns, in Bogoun, a village about thirty kilometers from Dassa in Benin Republic. This new monastery is a foundation of the monastery of Our Lady of Peace of Rweza, Burundi.

The four founding Dominican nuns: Sr Noémie MURERWA, Sr Severa NIZIGIYIMANA, Sr Rose Marie SIMAZEYOSE et Sr Languide HAKIZIMANA were installed in their monastery at the end of the Eucharistic celebration presided over by Fr Clement AHOUANDJINOU, op, from the Dominican convent of Cotonou.

Excellencies,

None of us can feel untouched by what is happening in Iraq at the moment. What we see happening there is screaming out for solidarity and a coordinated response to stop the extreme violation of human rights against defenceless minority groups who are deprived of their basic human dignity. This is violating International Humanitarian Law and is a crime against humanity. Our own brothers and sisters are among these people who continuously keep us informed of their terrifying plight. The perpetrators are posing a serious threat not only to all the people of Iraq and of all its neighbouring countries but to all of us, as they represent a mind-set and approach to life that, if successful, will attract many more adherents who can imperil any state. While the conflict appears to be about religion, in fact it has nothing to do with religion as God is a God of life and not of death.

We are blessed to have a forum such as the United Nations where commitment exists to build a harmonious and peaceful world. However, many people in fragile situations have become cynical of its operation when their cries for help and protection fall on deaf ears. This current crisis can be an opportunity to break out of a mentality focused only on “our own national interests” to one focused on ensuring the preservation of life and human dignity of every single human being regardless of race, ethnic origin, religion, or any other identity.

We commend the efforts of those countries that are responding to the security and humanitarian needs of the fleeing people of Iraq. However, this is still not enough to ensure their survival. When a state does not have the capacity to control brutal levels of violence that the world agrees needs to be stopped (as is the case now in Iraq), then the international community has an obligation to intervene to remove the capacity of the perpetrators of that violence.

In the light of this, we call upon you and all the Member States of the United Nations

  • to be seized of this crisis in Iraq today and to ensure the immediate deployment of specialist military units from as many countries as possible that have the necessary capacity to stop the ethnic and sectarian cleansing taking place, to ensure the safe return of the refugees to their homes and to bring the perpetrators to justice.
  • to stop the provision of any arms to the perpetrators and to sanction those who continue to provide arms to them.
  • to respond immediately to defuse the humanitarian crisis currently escalating.
  • to protect the persecuted members of minority groups and, according to International Humanitarian Law, to grant them asylum without delay.
  • to put in place immediately conditions for dialogue and peace talks that include all sectors of the society.

We hope and pray that you and your governments will answer to this urgent call.

Fr Bruno Cadoré OP
Master of the Dominican Order (Order of Preachers)

(14 August 2014)